The Mystery of Love

One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life: That word is love.― Sophocles

The Mystery of Love by Lisa Hunt-Wotton

It is no small thing for me that as a Commonwealth Registered Celebrant I get to walk couples across the threshold of marriage.  It is a great privilege and something that I hold very dear.  To experience over and over again the wonder of love.  The open hearts, the vows, the promises and the values that they choose to build their lives upon.

Each couple, each person so unique, so precious.  Each wedding so incredibly different.  A reflection of the lives and creativity of each couple.  Whether a small private gathering of  8 people or a crowd of 250 people, each is magical and full of wonder in their own special way.

This weekend I conducted five weddings across Melbourne.  Friends looked on in exhaustion but I revelled in the celebration of love and mystery of relationships.  You see I fall in love with each couple.  I grieve a little at the end of each wedding as our journey comes to its rightful conclusion.   I am constantly in awe at the beauty of each soul and the glimpse that I get into the communities of love that surround them.

For many of us marriage encapsulates the mystery of love.  The very nature of a wedding ceremony is about capturing the love essence of each couple and what love means to them.  Two people fell in love which is why they are getting married.  The marriage ceremony is the public demonstration of that love and their commitment to stay in love and to choose love each day over  the course of their lives together.

These two readings by Nicholas Sparks and Anne Morrow talk about love and relationships and what it means.

“NOTEBOOK”

I am nothing special; just a common man with common thoughts, and I’ve led a common life. There are no monuments dedicated to me and my name will soon be forgotten.  But in one respect I have succeeded as gloriously as anyone who’s ever lived: I’ve loved another with all my heart and soul; and to me, this has always been enough.

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 GIFT FROM THE SEA BY ANNE MORROW LINDBERGH 

When you love someone, you do not love them all the time in exactly the same way, from moment to moment. It is an impossibility. It is even a lie to pretend to. And yet this is exactly what most of us demand. We have so little faith in the ebb and flow of life, of love and of relationships. We leap at the flow of the tide and resist in the terror of the ebb. We are afraid it will never return.

We insist on permanency, on duration, on continuity, when the only continuity possible, in life as in love, is in growth, in fluidity, in freedom.

The only real security is not in owning or possessing, not in demanding or expecting, not in hoping, even. Security in a relationship lies neither in looking back to what was in nostalgia, not forward to what it might be in dread or anticipation, but living in the present relationship and accepting it as it is now.

Relationships must be like islands, one must accept them for what they are here and now, within their limits—islands, surrounded and interrupted by the sea, and continually visited and abandoned by the tides of life.

(Gift from the Sea, Anne Morrow Lindbergh)

When you read these pieces one thing is clear.  Love is a mystery and love is a gift.  You can’t own it, it is freely given and must be treasured.  For love to grow it must face the challenges that growth brings.  Love is like the sun and the earth.

Love is like the sun above you and the earth below you. Like the sun  love should be a constant source of light, and like the earth, a firm foundation from which to grow.

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Although not Buddhist, one couple chose to express their vows and promises in an amended version of  Buddhist vows.  These vows acknowledge the transitions, ebb and flow of relationship.  They also encompass community, nature and the understanding that all things belong and that we are part of a larger picture.

Buddhist tradition.

Lisa:  Do you pledge to help each other to develop your hearts and minds, cultivating compassion, generosity, ethics, patience, enthusiasm, concentration and wisdom as you age and undergo the various ups and downs of life and to transform them into the path of love, compassion, joy and equanimity?

Bride and Groom: “We do.”

Lisa: Recognising that the external conditions in life will not always be smooth and that internally your own minds and emotions will sometimes get stuck, do you pledge to see all these circumstances as a challenge to help you grow, to open your hearts, to accept yourselves, and each other; and to generate compassion for others who are suffering?

Bride and Groom: “We do.”

Lisa: Understanding that just as we are a mystery to ourselves, each other person is also a mystery to us, do you pledge to seek to understand yourselves, each other, and all living beings, to examine your own minds continually and to regard all the mysteries of life with curiosity and joy?

Bride and Groom: “We do.”

Lisa: Do you pledge to preserve and enrich your affection for each other?  To take the loving feelings you have for one another and your vision of each other’s potential and inner beauty, and to radiate this love outwards in an example for all beings?

Bride and Groom: “We do.”

In its essence, love is about giving.  It is about growing and it is about Shalom.  It is learning about how to live in peace with your beloved and with everyone around you.  It is understanding that true love gives and gives and keeps on giving.  Marriage in its simplest form is making a public commitment to choose to love, over and over again each day.  Through each ebb and through every high tide.

It is to commit to ‘undergo the various ups and downs of life and to transform them into the path of love, compassion, joy and equanimity?’.  It is to radiate love to all beings.  This  is known the gospel of love to those who are followers of the teachings of Christ. Christ teaches us to love everyone the way that we love ourselves.  In a way marriage is but an example of how we should treat every being.

The mystery of love is demonstrated and spoken out loud in the form of a Marriage ritual but love is not exclusive to marriage.  Love is something that we should choose every  day and demonstrate to every soul that we meet.    It is found wherever value is placed upon another soul, where we step outside ourselves and demonstrate compassion and understanding.  We need it more than ever and in every context.  I think it may be impossible to love too much.  In each day that we face on this earth and in every situation,  lets choose love.

Music for your Wedding.

Are you at a bit of a loss when it comes to choosing the perfect songs for your wedding.

Music will play a big part in your wedding so it’s important to give it a bit of thought.  My advice is to hire live music, especially for the ceremony.  I do a lot of weddings.  Live music takes your ceremony to a whole new level.  The ambience and emotions that live music evokes is well worth the extra $400.00 to have a harp, guitarist, vocalist or strings.

The perfect music for your wedding

Set the right mood with the right song for the special parts of your wedding day. Be inspired by other couples, rate your favourites or submit a new song.

Easy Weddings is a great sight for all of your wedding needs.  They have a page devoted to wedding songs.

Click Here

From Ceremony songs to cake cutting songs, father and daughter dance songs and anything else that you need.

Ceremony Music

  • Pre-service music:  This is the music that sets the tone and style of your wedding day.  Make sure that the music is in keeping with your theme.  E.G.:  Indie, Classical, Modern, Chilled.
  • Processional: This is the music that accompanies the walk down the aisle. You’ll need to pick a song for your bridesmaids to walk down the aisle to, and then a song for the bride’s entrance.
  • Music for the Signing:  At the signing of the register, I need to collect 15 signatures.  This usually takes about 5  – 6 min depending on what the photographer wants to do at that moment.  Usually you need one signature song with a back up ready to go in case the photos take up a bit of time.
  • Recessional: The recessional is like the opposite of the processional — it’s when you walk down the aisle, but the other way. For your big exit, you could go with something more upbeat because the pressure is off. (source)

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Top Wedding Songs for 2017

Beyoncé: “All Night”
Emili Sandé: “Breathing Underwater”
Digital Farm Animals: “Only One”
Taylor Swift: “I Don’t Want to Live Forever”
DJ Snake & Justin Bieber: “Let Me Love You”
Bruno Mars: “24k Magic”
Rihanna: “Love on the Brain”
John Legened: “Love Me Now”
Dua Lipa: “Blow Your Mind”
The Weeknd ft Daft Punk: “I Feel It Coming”
James Arthur: “Say You Won’t Let Go”
Tory Lanez: “Love”
Train: “Play That Song”
Fetty Wap ft Nicki Minaj: “Like a Star”
BigBang: “Fxxk It”
Childish Gambino: “Have Some Love”
Rae Sremmurd ft. Gucci Mane: “Black Beatles”
Solange ft Common: “Cranes in the Sky” (Remix)
Ariana Grande ft. Nicki Minaj: “Side to Side”
The Chainsmokers ft. Daya: “Don’t Let Me Down”
Calvin Harris ft. Rihanna: “This is What You Came For”
Andy Grammer: “Fresh Eyes”
Fitz and The Tantrums: “Handclap”
Ellie Goulding: “Still Falling For You”
Justin Timberlake: “Can’t Stop the Feeling”

 

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Some Stats on Australian Weddings Thanks to Easy Weddings.

What the bride and groom of 2016 in Australia looks like

Average bride and groom in Australia

 

Around 121,197 couples get married in Australia each year and each of those couples is unique in who they are, how they met, what they believe in and what their reason for marrying is. However, when you look at the overall data as we did in Easy Wedding‘s 2016 Annual Australian Wedding Survey, a picture of the ‘average’ Australian bride and groom emerges.

Introducing Mr and Mrs Average Wedding Couple

The average Australian bride is 28 years old on her wedding day. Her groom is just a year older at 29 and they have been engaged for 23 months. That’s a long time to think about who you are going to choose to supply services such as photography or wedding dresses or bonboniere for your wedding day.

While 89% of brides are aged 35 years or under when they marry, just 72% of grooms are aged 35 on their wedding day and, though it is most likely they met through friends (35%), it’s almost just as likely that they met at work, school or university (29%). What’s the lesson for anyone looking to find their match? Start socialising more with your existing friends and always turn up to  work and school!

The bride of 2016 Australia

They support same sex marriage

The Australian bride and groom are all about inclusivity with 89% of them believing same sex marriage should be legalised in Australia – a figure that is up 4% from the same time last year.

98% of the brides will have attended between 1 and 5 weddings in the 12 months before her wedding day, so she’ll likely have an idea of what she wants and likes by the time she visits a wedding supplier. It also means she might see wedding suppliers she likes and hire them for her own wedding. That’s brilliant free advertising for your business.

The groom of 2016 in Australia

How many guests are Aussie couples inviting?

When planning their own wedding, the average Australian bride and groom will invite 98 guests. That’s down 2.4% from last year’s results. 89% of them will hold their wedding in their home state or territory and 78% of all couples will have either a gift registry or a wishing well.

This leads us into our data around wedding gifts. Of the 2300 plus couples who answered our survey 88% of them said they believed a wedding gift of up to $250 was appropriate for close friends and family, while 60% considered a gift of about $100 as being appropriate for other people whose weddings they are invited to.

How large is the bridal party?

Including themselves, 49% of couples will have between 7 and 10 people in their bridal party and 30% of couples will already be parents (or pregnant) on their wedding day.

And what happens after the wedding?

And what are their priorities after their wedding is over? It’s starting a family (33%), buying a home (30%), travelling (14%), focusing on their career (9%) and improving their education (2%) but 12% listed ‘other’ as their post-wedding priority.

 

 

Why I Wanted A Smaller Wedding

Seven years and two kids ago, my (now) husband knelt on a moonlit boat dock in Camden, Maine, and asked if I would love him forever. For me, it was a no-brainer. I wept and said yes. There was no one there but us and the moon and the swaying boats in the harbour. There was no ring. There was just his earnest ask. I treasured that intimacy, and I wanted to carry it through to our wedding vows.

I was not someone who had been planning her wedding since childhood. I had no vision for what I wanted or what my dress would be — I actually admire women who are this decisive. The only thing I knew for certain was that I wanted my wedding to be small. To me, this was my most personal moment — the moment where I pledged to love another person through all of life’s triumphs and tragedies, and that felt sacred to me. The thought of saying my vows, personal and handwritten, in front of people who I might not even know seemed counter to how I wanted the moment to feel and be remembered.

A few weeks after our engagement, I told my then-fiancé that I’d like to have around 20 people at our wedding. The two of us, his three best friends and their plus-ones, my three best friends and their plus-ones, and our parents and their significant others (his parents are divorced). He was stunned. My husband is loving and charismatic and has a wide social circle. “But,” he argued, “we need more people on the dance floor!” Point taken.

I grew up attending large, gregarious weddings my whole life. I’m from a big extended family, and I loved those gatherings, but I wanted something different for myself. My family alone would have been nearly 100 people. My parents had a difficult time understanding that I wanted to get married far away and have only a handful of people attend. As it often happens while planning a wedding, tensions mounted and feelings were hurt. How would I balance the desires of my family with what I really wanted for my wedding? Meanwhile, my husband’s list took on a life of its own. “Weddings are also about having fun,” he reasoned.

Eventually, we got the number to 40 people. My husband, bless his heart, even added a couple of people two days before the wedding. I’m glad that I compromised with him and had more people attend because ultimately part of marriage is about consistently compromising with your partner to ensure you are each happy.

My husband and I were concerned that we would be blubbering messes while delivering the vows that we wrote for each other. So, instead, we were married with traditional vows during the ceremony. Then, that night in the honeymoon suite, damp with sweat from dancing (you see a theme here, right?) and high on the adrenaline of the day, we sweetly read our handwritten vows to each other. Not a soul on this earth has heard those vows but us, and each year on our wedding anniversary, we take them out and read them to each other again.

In the end, our wedding still felt incredibly intimate because all of the people who attended are still in our lives, and they have supported us through some truly difficult times. I’m extremely grateful that they could be there to bear witness to our marriage. And to shake their asses on the dance floor.


Read more at https://www.popsugar.com.au/love/Benefits-Having-Small-Wedding-43504147#9U8xxuKSCws0p72i.99

A Wedding Seen Through the Eyes of Love

As a producer and creative director over many decades I am familiar with working alongside other creatives, writers, musicians and artists.  Your talent radar goes OFF when you are around other gifted creatives.  This happened on Sunday morning.

The day before I was honoured to officiate the marriage of Brenton De Zylva and Cassie Mitchell.  The next day the bride was uploading photos onto Face Book ,as you do.  In one of the posts she published an account of the wedding which was written by her baby sister Georgia who was the junior bridesmaid.  Georgia is 10 years old.

I have asked for permission to publish this today.

I wanted to share it with you because it is such an exceptional account of a wedding through the eyes of wonder and of pure love.

Photo Cred by Barry Kearney.

Mr & Mrs de Zylva – by Georgia

“You may now kiss the bride,” announced the celebrant!

Woo, woo, woo, woo, woo, this fairy-tale recount doesn’t begin here it progressively unfolds with what really happens behind the scenes of my older sister Cassie’s wedding!

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Instead of just having a wedding day why not have a wedding week!

And that’s basically what occurred for my sister during this crazy time of ‘wedding ness’. It’s stressful, exciting and a lot of fun! It’s especially awesome if you are part of the bridal party because it tells you that you mean something quite special to either the bride or groom.
I was especially fortunate to be a bridesmaid for my sister.   I was accompanied by 2 other girls, my other sister Sarah and Cassie’s best friend, that she’s know for 15 years, Steph.

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It was an absolute honour to be a Junior  bridesmaid!

During the week many little things were being taken care of, prepared for or practiced for the special occasion!

The 24th of Feb 2017.   It was a little bit frightening knowing that my sister was actually get married the next day. On this day we did a few quite special things to make this wedding become what every girl dreams of a wedding being! This included a spray tans, manicures and much more!

The night of the wedding I was lucky enough to get too stay with my sister/bride. We stayed in a very secluded little cottage in Yerring! Before I drifted to sleep I watched a movie Now and Then with my sister! And seeing as though it was getting late we paused the movie for a bit and eventually fell asleep!

“Wakey, Wakey” murmed Cassie.  Apparently  I woke up with the biggest smile on my face. It was ‘the day’,  not just any day ‘the wedding day’!  I was just bursting with excitement and happiness, I just couldn’t believe that my sister was finally getting married. I just couldn’t explain how joyful I was and I was soooooooo happy that my sister had found the one for her!

Unfortunately I had to awaken at 6:30am that morning to begin because things were going to get crazy at 8:30am with the makeup artist and hairdresser both arriving! We had a schedule so things wouldn’t turn out boncos but I’m pretty positive that things would have been quite fine if there wasn’t a plan.  I had my hair done before makeup and seeing as though I’ve got lots of hair,  a hairstyle wasn’t to hard to create! In the end I had my hair curled and in a braid to the side. My makeup also looked equally awesome! Cassie was lucky enough to have won a contest and she won a wedding videographer! We also had the photographer there during the day.

We’re finally dressed and ready to roll after many photos and relaxing! I was wearing a pale pink dress and it was a bit chilli on the night so I got a bit cold.

Once we arrive at the venue I couldn’t believe that it was actually happening. It was so nerve racking seeing all of the people watching! As I walked down the aisle I became less and less nervous!

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During the ceremony I felt like bursting into tears because I was so happy, especially when they signed the paper work to finalise there long lasting marriage.

“And now you may kiss the bride” announced the celebrant! My sister was no longer a Mitchell she was now a de Zilva.

At the end of the ceremony it was time for photos and more photos and more! It seemed as though it never ended. I greeted many family members end it seemed as though the night never ended but of course it had to, and at the end of night I couldn’t have been any happier for my dearest sister!

And I dearly hope that my sister has her happily ever after……..

by 10 year old Junior Bridesmaid Georgia.

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Were Did Wedding Customs Come From

When planning a wedding the list of rituals and ceremonies to cover can actually get quite long.    A white wedding dress, matching bridesmaids dresses,  wedding veils,  something borrowed something blue,  rings on the fourth finger of the left hand,  wedding cakes and sayings like tying the knot and giving your hand in marriage.    What about the bouquet, the garter toss??  All of these rituals and ceremonies have a history and a beginning.  Most are steeped in folk lore and involve good luck and protection from evil spirits.

Where did all of these things come from?

1. The custom of placing rings on the fourth finger of the left hand came from the Egyptians who believed that there is a vein of love that runs from from the heart to the fourth finger on the left hand signifying both the union of the hands and hearts.

2. Queen Victoria is credited with starting the Western world’s white wedding dress trend in 1840 — before then, brides simply wore their best dress.

3:  Custom of the Eternity Ring.  The custom of the eternity ring is thousands of years old and dates back to ancient Egypt.  Wedding eternity rings are designed to symbolize the never-ending circle of both love and life.  The Egyptians believed that love was eternal and was stronger than death.

bridesmaid

 

4. If your bridesmaids are less than thrilled about matching dresses, tell them they’re good luck! The tradition of matching maids dates back to Roman times, when people believed evil spirits would attend the wedding in attempt to curse the bride and groom (how rude). Bridesmaids were required to dress exactly like the bride in order to confuse the spirits and bring luck to the marriage (source).

5. On a similar note, brides traditionally wear veils because ancient Greeks and Romans believed they protected her from evil spirits (source).

6. Tossing the Bouquet.  Tossing the bouquet is a tradition that stems from England. Women used to try to rip pieces of the bride’s dress and flowers in order to obtain some of her good luck. To escape from the crowd the bride would toss her bouquet and run away.   Sounds terrifying to me.

7. The original version of the Wedding Cake could give you a headache.  One of the first traditions began in Ancient Rome where bread was broken over the bride’s head to bring good fortune to the couple. In Medieval England cakes were stacked as high as possible for the bride and groom to kiss over.

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8. Ever wondered where the phrase “tying the knot” came from? In medieval days couples hands were bound together or hand fasted.  It may have been a year before the local cleric or priest came though the celtic village so the couple would bind their hands together in a small ceremony before the community to pledge their love and committment to each other and to be hand fast or to tie the knot.

handfasting

 

10. Where did the Honey Moon come from? “Honeymoon” also has origins that date back to the 5th century, when cultures represented calendar time with moon cycles. Back then, a newlywed couple drank mead (the “honey”) during their first moon of marriage. Mead is a honey-based alcoholic drink believed to have aphrodisiac properties.

In some very early honeymoon origins, including (but not just) Scandinavian, it involves kidnapping.  Many brides were kidnapped by their grooms.  They were then hidden away for months, until either their family stopped looking for them or they became pregnant (and thus it was considered too late for the marriage to be nullified) (source).

11:  History of the bridal bouquet.  The custom of carrying bouquets originated in ancient times, when it was believed that carrying or wearing strong-smelling herbs and spices would ward off evil spirits, ill health and bad luck. Later, Romans extended this tradition, when the bride and groom both wore garland made of herbs and spices that were expected to bring good luck and fertility. An actual bouquet came to symbolize a bride in bloom.

 

wedding-bouquetTraditional Celtic bouquets included ivy, thistle and heather. If a bride carried sage, the flower of wisdom, she was to become wise. If she carried dill, the flower of lust, well, she became lusty (if that’s a word). Flower girls would carry sheaves of wheat, which symbolized growth and fertility (Source).

12:  Diamonds are Forever?  Until the 19th century, all sorts of gems and stones were given to symbolise betrothal,  even thimbles.  The use of the diamond as an engagement ring really came about through a successful advertising campaign.  In the 1930s, when demand for diamond rings declined in the U.S. during hard economic times, the De Beers Company began an aggressive marketing campaign using photographs of glamorous movie stars swathed in diamonds. Within three years, the sales of diamonds had increased by 50 percent.

In 1947, De Beers launched its now classic slogan, “A Diamond is Forever.” This campaign spurred even more sales. The implied durability of a diamond conveyed the meaning in the American psyche that marriage is forever. A diamond’s purity and sparkle have now become symbols of the depth of a man’s commitment to the woman he loves in practically all corners of the world.

I hope you found this as interesting as I did.  Lisa.

 

Love Poems for Weddings

On Our Wedding Day

 By Mand

Published on October 3, 2016

Be with me whenever you can. Love me for what I am.

Convince me when I am in doubt. Give me hope when I seem without.

Respect me, show me you care. Stand by me, always be there.

Forgive me if I should do wrong. Caress me when nights seem so long.

Assure me, allay my fears. Be faithful throughout the years.

Trust me as I will trust you. Encourage my dreams my life through.

Be with me whenever you can. Love me for what I am.

 

You Touched My Hand

“You touched my hand and reached my thoughts,

You kissed my lips and reached my heart,

 

You looked into my eyes and touched my soul.

No words were said, no thoughts exchanged.

Through only a touch you changed me,

With only a kiss you moved me,

With only a look you brought me life.”

 

What is Love?

by Anne Landers

Love is friendship that has caught fire.
It is quiet understanding, mutual confidence, sharing and forgiving.
It is loyalty through good and bad times.
It settles for less than perfection and makes allowances for human weaknesses.
Love is a hand to hold when times are dark.
love
To The Love Of My Life
© Carson BalddwinPublished on February 2015

It is a stepThat I am willing to Take with you.
I want to risk Everything whenI say, “I do.”

From here on out I wish to declare
All of my love That we share.
When you ask me
How I feel,
I say it is a mixture
Of passion that will heal.
It is a powerful thing
That I cannot explain,
But I want to overcome
Every joy and every pain.
Through the many tears
That will be shed,
Through all the good times and the bad,
I am glad
That I will spend it with you.
For our love is so very strong,
And when we are old,
I want you to know
That I have risked
Everything with you Until our dying breath
From that day
I said, “I do.”
 Matt and Tanya Wedding
The Secrets Of A Good Marriage

© Ellie Kelsch

Published on July 2011

Growing up I’ve learnt about love, I’ve been surrounded by it everyday. I’m so glad you’ve both found it, And it’s why we’re here today.

They say there’s secrets to a good marriage, That there are rules to obey,
But the most important rules of love,
Are what you two do everyday.

It’s the ‘hey babes’ in the morning, It’s how she makes his tea,
It’s the way he smiles at her, Such a sweet thing to see.

It’s never being to old to hold hands, Or to watch movies on the couch, It’s accepting all the flaws,
Even when the other’s a grouch.

It’s telling him he’s not going grey, It’s the ‘You look fine in those jeans’ It’s ignoring the mid-life crisis,
and all her little ‘scenes’.

It’s facing the world as one,
And it’s more than love at first sight, It’s together being a family,
Each and every day and night.

It’s the way he looks into her eyes,

Lisa Hunt-Wotton

It’s the way that she looks too, It’s why they stand before us, and it’s why they said ‘I do’.

And now I stand here today,
On this important moment in life, With two people very in love, Now husband and wife.

Growing up, I’ve learnt about love,
and seeing it today proves it true,
You’ve both taught me so much,
And I’d be lucky to be half as happy as you.

 Olya s
Love Is Here To Stay

Its very clear, our love is here to stay

Not for a year, but forever and a day

The radio and the telephone,

And the movies that we know

May just be passing fancies

And in time may go

But, oh my dear

Our love is here to stay

Together we’re going a long long way

In time the Rockies may crumble

Gibraltar may tumble

They’re only made of clay

But our love is here to stay

 

Ella Fitzgerald

Spectacular Wedding in the Secret Garden

What a spectacular day at the Sky High ‘secret garden’ at Mount Dandenong.  The sun was shining and the flowers blooming.  Absolutely magnificent couple and stunning location.  I was so privileged to be a part of this special day.

Thank you to Jess and Dan for this very beautiful review.  It was such a special day.

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Jessica T. on 30 Dec, 2016

“Lisa was absolutely amazing. We honestly couldn’t have asked for a better celebrant. She made us feel so comfortable and at home from the very first meeting. My now husband and I left the consultation and took one look at each other and said YES we found our celebrant. With Lisa you get some ‘homework’ which was brilliant because it actually helped Lisa to get to know our story and our love for one another. She wrote the most amazing ceremony and included our parents in it which they loved. I even had guests say that Lisa got a little emotional! That was very true, Lisa is such a genuine, down to earth person. She made us so comfortable with the whole process and she definitely hasn’t seen the last of us! We will be recommending her to everyone we know. Thank you for all your hard work and support for our wedding. It was truly magical. Thank you, Daniel and Jessica-Kate Fordham. ❤”

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Photo Credit:  Will Chao

 

Wedding Date : 10 Nov, 2016

Venue:  Secret Garden Category: Marriage Celebrant

Gorgeous Garden Wedding

Gorgeous Wedding captured by Kerryn from Precise Moment Photography.

Precise Moment Photography is one of Melbourne’s leading wedding photography studios based in the northern suburb of Craigieburn.   If you are looking for a wedding photographer who is professional, friendly and knows how to capture your individual wedding day story in a candid, natural way with an artistic flair without having to worry about posing for your photos all day, then look no further!

ABIA Top 10 Victorian Wedding Photography Finalist 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2015 & 2016.

This wedding was held at Bram Leigh Receptions:    Known for its romantic fairy lit gardens, exceptional cuisine, stunning chandelier lit ballroom and hundreds of onsite photo opportunities; you will soon discover why Bram Leigh is an Award Winning venue set at the foot hills of the Dandenong Ranges, the gateway to Yarra Valley.

wedding-in-the-garden-rotunda

We had a lot of fun at this relaxed and happy wedding.  The nerves got the better of the groom at one stage and I had to jokingly introduce them to one another.  “Nathan, I would like to introduce you to Beth – you can take her hand she is a very nice girl and won’t bite”.  It was a very funny moment.

nathan-meet-beth

 

The bride and groom chose the ‘mother of the groom’ to be one of the witnesses which is a lovely opportunity to honour someone you love.

signing-the-register

It was a stunning day at such a beautiful venue.  The quiet gazebo was a perfect place for this precious moment.